MSIS #3: Assessment

ramblings from the 3rd institute at the Shanghai American School

Kick-off: What’s worth celebrating & sharing?

Themes for the Weekend

  • “Assessment is a process of gathering and using evidence of learning to improve teaching & learning.”
  • Formative assessment is a critical part of learning. If it’s “graded”, it ain’t formative.
  • Effective assessment balances DOK (Depth of Knowledge) levels 1-3. [Level 4 = projects]
  • What & how we assess drives what & how we teach.

What is our primary focus? Teaching Mathematics – therefore, where is the curriculum & assessment coming from. Our job should not be to create curriculum & assessment. So, where should we find these great items?

How are assessment questions aligned with instructional practice?

Characteristics of high quality assessment

  • Justification / explanations
  • Multiple strategies
  • Models can be used to support
  • Reasoning / critiquing
  • Fair
  • Aligned to standards
  • Limits complexity of language

DOK – what is the cognitive complexity?

  • Content is assessed @ DOK 1 & 2
  • Problem Solving – DOK 2 & 3
  • Communicating & Reasoning – DOK 2 & 3 (with some 4)
  • Modeling & Data Analysis – DOK 1-4

DOK does not equal level of achievement of student.

DOK Levels (What kind of thinking is needed to respond?)

  1. Recall & Reproduction
  2. Basic Skills & Concepts
    1. Mental processing beyond recall is necessary.
  3. Strategic Thinking & Reasoning
  4. Extended Thinking

Excel vs Exceed – does a shift to “excel” have more meaning

  • Evidence of complete understanding
  • Evidence of reasonable understanding
  • Evidence of inadequate understanding
  • No Evidence

Rigor – the pursuit of

  • conceptual understanding
  • procedural skill & fluency
  • application

with equal intensity

Standards Based drivers

  • What should my students be able to do?
  • How will we know when my students are successful?
  • What will I do if they “got it”?
  • What will I do if they did not “get it”?

Assessment –

  • something that we do with (not to) a student.
  • integrated with the learning.
  • DOK level of instruction should be above the level of assessment

Curriculum

  • What you are teaching – the standards
  • When you are teaching – scope & sequence
  • How you are teaching – teacher instruction

 

Students must benefit from formative assessment.

Comparing Tasks – how do we improve existing tasks / assessments ?

Justification & the Frayer Model – how do the mathematics and model justify each other?

 

 

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Comment Codes

From Shannon Andrews(@andrewsshannon2) “I remember reading on Fawn Nguyen’s (@fawnpnguyen) website Finding Ways that she grades using a highlighter.  During the Principles to Actions math chat, Frank McGowan (@frankmcgowa) talked about using comment codes.  Instead of writing the same questions and comments on EVERY SINGLE PAPER, Frank attaches a code to each comment or question. I believe he collaborated with his English Department on this.  Then when the assignment is returned, he gives them a reflection sheet which includes the codes.

So here is how I applied the same idea in my class this weekend as I was grading.  Frank, maybe you can offer your insights as well.”

This post is an attempt to provide my beginning use of comment codes. Any ideas are appreciated! Comment Codes are something that I’ve begun working with this year. My hope behind the trial was:

  1. avoid writing the same comment on many different papers,
  2. reduce time in providing comments to students, and
  3. (most importantly) shift the burden of analyzing work and finding errors to students.

Credit for this idea comes from the post on Pragmatic Education titled: What if you marked every book, every lesson? In this post, Joe Kirby (@joe__kirby), describes making with icons or numbers.

As I begin looking over student work, I begin writing comment codes. On a student’s page, the code is placed inside a hexagon (bad move on my part – all assessments have been returned and I’ve no copies. Sorry!). Student work is returned with a reflection sheet that asks them to process their work. I’m still working on the format of this and any ideas are much appreciated.

Types of comments (In general, I tend to pose questions in the attempt to guide students):

  1. Error check – In many cases, students are doing great mathematics/science but need to look back over their work.
  2. Expansion of ideas / connection to evidence: A big theme is communication. Are students explaining their ideas? When available, is evidence being used?
  3. Basic understanding: sometimes a student might need a quick reminder or prompt. Is it notation (i.e. using absolute value symbols)?

Using comment codes to plan future lessons: I think there is a lot of potential in recording these comments linked to assessments/topics. On one hand, it’s easy to note the numbers that are being regularly written down. Hey! That’s a class issue. On the other hand, in a following year, the comment codes can be looked at when planning the unit and asking what were the typical areas of challenge for students.

Below are examples of comment codes used from a math and a science assessment.

 

Comment Codes in Math

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Comment Codes in Science

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